share

Roasted Rutabaga with Maple Syrup and Thyme

This roasted swede (roasted rutabaga) dish is a wonderful addition to your dinner table. Sweet and fragrant with an earthy note, this side dish will have guest begging for the recipe. Just be sure to cook this for long enough to get the good caramelly bits.

This roasted rutabaga (swede) dish is a wonderful addition to your dinner table. Sweet and fragrant with an earthy note, this side dish will have guest begging for the recipe. Just be sure to cook this for long enough to get the good caramelly bits.

This roasted rutabaga was originally posted in 2016. But has been updated with new pictures, dual measurements and nutritional information.

This roasted swede (roasted rutabaga) dish is a wonderful addition to your dinner table. Sweet and fragrant with an earthy note, this side dish will have guest begging for the recipe. Just be sure to cook this for long enough to get the good caramelly bits.

What is Rutabaga?

Rutabaga is a yellow brown root vegetable that is part of the cabbage family.
It is a very underused vegetable, possibly because it looks pretty ugly in the shops, and people are worried about peeling and preparing it.
It is called swede in many parts of the world, but the term rutabaga is unique to the US.

 What is the difference between Turnip and Rutabaga?

Although they are similar, turnips have a slightly more bitter flavour. You could use turnip in this recipe, but the flavor will be quite different.

Is rutabaga low carb?

Rutabaga is a really healthy alternative to potatoes. When roasted they are crispy on the outside and fluffy inside like a roast potato but with significantly lower carbs.

This roasted swede (roasted rutabaga) dish is a wonderful addition to your dinner table. Sweet and fragrant with an earthy note, this side dish will have guest begging for the recipe. Just be sure to cook this for long enough to get the good caramelly bits.

This roasted rutabaga dish is pretty special. We all know I love roasted veg!!!! If I can roast it, then I will!!! And I haven’t found a vegetable that isn’t delicious when roasted. In fact many vegetables taste better roasted! Take my roasted broccoli dish. Honestly it is amazing. And my roasted Brussels sprouts with fish sauce vinaigrette have been know to convert non-sprout eaters!!!!!

If you love roasted veg as much as I do, then check out my roasted veg recipe collection, full of delicious ways to cook your 5 a day.
I served this roasted rutabaga up with a steak and side salad, but they would be fabulous as part of a roast, or along side a grilled chicken dish.

Please use really maple syrup here, flavoured syrups won’t give you the wonderful flavor or sticky crispy finish.

This roasted swede (roasted rutabaga) dish is a wonderful addition to your dinner table. Sweet and fragrant with an earthy note, this side dish will have guest begging for the recipe. Just be sure to cook this for long enough to get the good caramelly bits.

Enjoy x


Why not pin these Roasted Rutabaga with Maple Syrup for later. Pin it here

This roasted swede (roasted rutabaga) dish is a wonderful addition to your dinner table. Sweet and fragrant with an earthy note, this side dish will have guest begging for the recipe. Just be sure to cook this for long enough to get the good caramelly bits.
4.83 from 17 votes
Print

Roasted Rutabaga with Maple Syrup and Thyme

This roasted rutabaga (roasted swede) dish is a wonderful addition to your dinner table. Sweet and fragrant with an earthy note, this side dish will have guest begging for the recipe. Just be sure to cook this for long enough to get the good caramelly bits.

Course Side
Cuisine Modern Australian
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 166 kcal
Author Claire | Sprinkles and Sprouts

Ingredients

You can change the measurement from US to metric at the bottom of this list

  • 1.5 lb swedes (about 3 small swedes)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons maple syrup (see notes)
  • salt
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • black pepper
  • 1 tbsp fresh thyme (for garnish - optional)

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 200ºC/390ºF. Place a roasting tin the oven to heat up.
  2. Peel the swedes and cut them into large chunks.
  3. Place the swedes in a and dress with the olive oil, maple syrup and dried thyme.
  4. Add in a good sprinkle of salt and pepper and toss to combine well.
  5. Spoon the swede into the roasting tin, reserving any dressing that has pooled at the bottom of the bowl.
  6. Roast in the oven, for 25 minutes, then drizzle over the reserved dressing and cook for a further 15-20 minutes until crisp and golden.
  7. Serve with a sprinkling of fresh thyme (Or chives works well too!)

Recipe Notes

Use real maple syrup here, the flavored syrups burn quickly and don't have the depth of flavor you need.

Nutrition Facts
Roasted Rutabaga with Maple Syrup and Thyme
Amount Per Serving
Calories 166 Calories from Fat 63
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 11%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Sodium 22mg 1%
Potassium 552mg 16%
Total Carbohydrates 24g 8%
Dietary Fiber 4g 16%
Sugars 16g
Protein 1g 2%
Vitamin C 51.5%
Calcium 9.4%
Iron 5.9%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Close up on the crispy edges of the roasted rutabaga.

 Roasted Rutabaga with Maple Syrup and Thyme Anecdote
(aka my recipe ramble for those who love the waffle)

I have a beautiful reader called Dorothy, she and I have become friends. We have so much in common, amongst them is a love of cocktails and seafood!!!!

Anyway, Dorothy is my American interpreter 😉 If I am unsure of anything then I check with her. The international language of food isn’t always clear cut. I am pretty lucky as when I moved to Australia I had to adopt the words capsicum, zucchini and eggplant (I am sure there are plenty more!!!!) so my food language has evolved. Add to that my obsession love of the cookery channel and the plethora of US cook shows, I am pretty well versed in arugula, cilantro etc. But I still like to check things with Dorothy.

Swede isn’t something I have seen in an American cook show, so I had to get Dorothy to confirm it for me. Turns out swedes are called swedes all over the world, except in America. There they are called rutabaga. Which is the coolest name ever and I want to start a movement to introduce the name rutabaga to Australia! 😉


If you love food why not subscribe to my newsletter, I will drop you an email every now and then, just to say hi and send you a couple of recipes think you might love, like this Roasted Rutabaga with Maple Syrup and Thyme.
It isn’t everyday! I am not that organised. Usually it is once a week (ish). And as a thank you I will send you my soup cookbook FREE. Full of my fav soups!
Subscribe today 🙂

book_ad

Also find me on:
Facebook | Instagram | Twitter.
Let’s share the food love and make the world a tastier place 🙂

Categories:

Related Posts

  1. Reply

    We call them rutabaga here in Canada too. I have never heard them called a swede. Love them! I’ve never tried them roasted before – only boiled and mashed or parboiled then finished in a quick sauté. I am about to put it in the oven with freshly boiled maple syrup to go along with local trout. Yum!

    1. Reply

      OH MAN!!!! Freshly boiled maple syrup sounds amazing! I bet this will be out of this world with your own maple!

    • Dannii
    • March 28, 2018
    Reply

    Oh that looksmperfectly Roasted. I love the combination of maple syrup and thyme.

    1. Reply

      Thank you Dannii, I just love maple syrup on veg 😀

  2. Reply

    mmm this rutabaga looks very tasty! I like the fact that this recipe can be prepared quickly and easily. It’s great for dinner for me and my family. Thanks for sharing this recipe!

    1. Reply

      It is such a great side for the family as the maple syrup gets the kids excited and when they eat their veg I get excited 😉

    • Alyssa
    • March 12, 2018
    Reply

    You know, I haven’t cooked much at all with rutabagas, and I also didn’t know they go by swedes outside the US! Love this roasted healthier alternative to potatoes with the maple syrup.

    1. Reply

      It really does seem to be an underused veg! I don’t know why, but yes a perfect alternative to roast potatoes 😀

  3. Reply

    I have never tried rutabaga before. Could you please let me know what is it and where can I find it?

    1. Reply

      It is a root vegetable Gujan. You can usually find it near the carrots and parsnips in the grocery store. It is yellowy brown and similar shape to a turnip.

      It has a earthy taste and is delicious roasted 😀

  4. Reply

    Roasted Rutabaga sounds amazing! My parents produce pure maple syrup on their farm, so we’ll definitely be trying your dish! Bet these flavors would be perfect on fingerling potatoes as well!

    1. Reply

      OH!!! I am super jealous of that Jessica!!!! I want home-made maple syrup!

      Ooooh it would be fabulous with fingerlings!

  5. Reply

    This is the perfect alternative to potatoes and the seasonings in this recipe are perfect for getting the kiddos to eat them too!! Love!!

    1. Reply

      If I even mention a dish has maple syrup in it then my kids will demolish it 😉

  6. Reply

    I agree – rutabagas are under utilized — and that’s too bad, because they’re really delicious. I’ve used them in soups and salads before, but this preparation looks delicious — and fairly easy to do. Will give your recipe a go this week — maybe with a rotisserie chicken.

    1. Reply

      It is definitely an easy side dish and so packed with flavor. Hope you love them 😀

  7. Reply

    You have such a lovely roast here! I’ve never tried roasting rutabaga before – this looks fantastic – such a perfect char!

    1. Reply

      I hope you get a chance to try it soon Shashi

  8. Reply

    I like the idea of having this roasted rutabaga in place of potatoes. Need to try that!

    1. Reply

      It is a great way to eat lower carbs without feeling like you are missing out 😀

  9. Reply

    Oh I need to try this, looks delicious and easy peasy!

    1. Reply

      It really is super easy! Especially if you have the oven on for a roasted meat etc

  10. Why do I never cook rutabagas? Have I been living under a rock? I love it as an alternative to potatoes and the spices look spot on!

    1. Reply

      They are such an underused veg, I don’t know why.

  11. Reply

    Ahh that syrupy glaze looks amazing!

    1. Reply

      The sticky crispy caramelised bits are the best!

  12. Reply

    I have yet to try rutabaga now I am inspired definitely roasting is the way to go. Intrigued on the addition of maple syrup I need to make this soon.

    1. Reply

      They are a delicious vegetable Adriana, especially with the sweet maple syrup.

    • Paul
    • March 11, 2018
    Reply

    Love your recipes.. My granddaughter is Claire too.

    Thank you

    1. Reply

      Thank you Paul 😀
      (All the best people are called Claire…or know a Claire 😉 )

  13. Reply

    What a great recipe of swede! I think it’s better and healthier than the potato one! Thank for sharing

    1. Reply

      Definitely healthier than potatoes and they add a great different flavour to dinner. Thank you for stopping by 😀

  14. Pingback: Put a Pin In It: The Root of the Problem | Humdrum Stick-in-the-Mud

    • Dorothy Dunton
    • October 29, 2016
    Reply

    Hi Claire! Had to tell you I was so excited to find swedes at my local store today!!! Gary looked at me and asked “what is that?” and I told him it was a swede (confused him even more until I said it is a rutabaga!), I’m thinking this recipe with a nice ribeye steak, some creamed spinach and, of course, wine! My tum is growling just thinking about it!

    1. Reply

      Oh yeah!!!

      How was it? Did Gary approve of swede? and I want ribeye and wine now!!!!!! xx

  15. Reply

    Hi Claire! You flatter me! I certainly don’t claim to know all, I just know how to dig around and find out what I want to know! What I do know is that these sound delicious! I love roasted vegetables, so much better than steamed!! So good with a nice juicy steak or roast chicken! And a glass of wine! 🙂

    1. Reply

      I don’t flatter!!!! You are my US knowledge bank!! x

      Roasted veg, steak and a glass of wine! That will be you and I one day Dorothy!!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Sprinkles and Sprouts
Close Cookmode
Pin
Share
Yum
Stumble
Tweet